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General Domestic Violence and Advocacy Webinar Recordings

The Battered Women's Justice Project will be posting links to selected webinar trainings.  They will be organized by topic and date.  These links will take you away from the BWJP website to iLinc's website where you will be asked to sign in to access the recording.  Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*).



Co-Advocacy


October 23, 2014

Presenter: Rosario de la Torre, Family Advocacy/Refugio Manager for Casa de Esperanza.

Description: Co-advocacy is a collaborative process of improving how organizations work together to ensure that they are providing appropriate resources and services to all participants they served. Co-advocacy services require on-going communication and sharing information, resources and tools between the organizations, as well as working together with the participants to ensure their needs are met. This webinar discusses strategies, tools and approaches for effective co-advocacy services.


Click here to access the recording.




Changing Police Culture: Moving Beyond Mandatory Arrest to Understanding Domestic Violence


September 4, 2014

Presenter: Captain Jon Sundermeier, Lincoln Police Department.

Description: The process of improving how police respond to domestic violence might often involve changing deeply engrained views and practices.  This webinar discusses ways to approach changing police culture from the perspective of a law enforcement manager.  Focus will be placed on getting officers to obtain and consider domestic violence histories as part of every investigation and then to consider the history when making decisions about the predominant aggressor and case outcomes. Advocacy and other system professionals will benefit from the information presented in addition to law enforcement professionals.


Click here to access the recording.



B
est Practices & Helpseeking Obstacles: Law Enforcement and Advocacy

August 11, 2014

Presenters: Dr. Sherry Hamby is Research Professor of Psychology and Director of the Life Paths Research Program at the University of the South, John Guard is a detective with the Major Crimes Division of the Pitt County, NC Sheriff’s office, and Margaret (Peg) Ruddy is the Executive Director of the Women’s Resource Center of Scranton, PA, serving in that capacity for 22 years and employed by WRC for 30 years.

Description: The faculty will discuss the findings of a national study of domestic violence witnessed by children. Among other findings, an exemplary level of police response (that which included at least 6 “best practices” for law enforcement – follow up after initial contact, safety planning with victim, assessment of child’s needs, provision of 911 telephone, description of protection orders and court procedures, connection with available shelter and services, explanation of effects of domestic violence on children, and efforts to help victims feel safe) was most associated with arrest. Contact with advocates involving referrals and protection order information was most associated with separation from domestic violence perpetrators. Obstacles to accessing services were identified. Helpseeking was not deterred by obstacles in the directions anticipated by researchers. Criminal justice case attrition was high across the full spectrum of criminal legal interventions. Practitioner faculty will reflect on the research and analyze it in light of the “best practices” and obstacles to service in their respective fields.

Article: Hamby, S., Finkelhor, D., Turner, H. (2014). “Intervention Following Family Violence: Best Practices and Helpseeking Obstacles in a Nationally Representative Sample of Families with Children.” (Publication in process.)


Click here to access the recording.



Understanding The Sword and Shield of Technology


July 15, 2014

Presenter: Valenda Applegarth is a Senior Staff Attorney at Greater Boston Legal Services in Boston, Massachusetts and founder of the nation’s first Relocation Counseling Project.

Description: Technology can be used to stalk, harass, and violate laws meant to protect victims, or to enhance victim privacy and safety. This webinar will showcase both aspects of technology using examples from cases of sexual assault, domestic violence, stalking, forced marriage, and other crimes. We will also address internet data gathering and sharing and what tools are available to protect survivor privacy
.

Click here to access the recording.




Developing a Framework for Advocates (and others) to Understand the Change Process of Men Who Batter


June 23, 2014

Presenters: Scott Miller, Blueprint Coordinator & Men’s Non-violence Coordinator with the Domestic Abuse Intervention Programs and Melissa Scaia, Executive Director Advocates for Family Peace (AFFP) & Domestic Abuse Intervention Programs (DAIP).

Description: Advocates often hear from battered women whose partners were arrested the following about his ability to change: “I know, but he promised he would never hit me again;” “He has agreed to go to counseling with me;” “If he goes to chemical dependency treatment everything will be ok;” “We are going to meet with our pastor;" or "He just needs anger management. He gets really angry sometimes.”

This webinar will provide advocates and other criminal justice providers with a framework to understand men's use of violence against women and how to convey this to battered women. The trainers will address the questions like, "Do batterers change?" "How can advocates answer these types of questions?" The discussion will include what research literature says about this contentious area; what advocates need to know about their local BIPs; and how victims are kept informed so they can make decisions for their own safety.

Click here to access the recording.



The Impact of Differential Sentencing of Batterers
 

May 20, 2014

Presenters: Andrew Klein, Ph.D. has served as a principal investigator on numerous research and evaluation grants for multiple federal, state and county government and non-profit agencies covering a diverse range of areas from family violence, The Honorable Michael Denton, presides over the Travis County Veterans Court, as well as Travis County Court Law number 4 for Domestic Violence, and James Henderson is a technical assistance provider for the US Department of Justice Office on Violence Against Women through the Battered Women’s Justice Project.

Description: The faculty will discuss research from a statewide study in Rhode Island on the impact of differential sentencing of batterers on recidivism. The investigation examined the severity of sentencing of DV perpetrators for both DV and non-DV offenses at the beginning of their “criminal careers.” The research revealed that the rate of new DV crimes was lower for those batterers who were initially sentenced more severely for DV crimes. The study tracked batterer involvement in the criminal legal system for twelve years after the initial DV prosecution, comparing the rates of criminal conduct (DV and non-DV) within the first 6 years after the predicate offense (baseline period) to the rate of criminal conduct in the following 6 years. Higher rates of DV re-offending after six years were associated with: more lenient sentencing for all criminal conduct, more severe sentencing for non-DV crimes compared with DV offenses, young age at first criminal legal system involvement, male gender, and higher numbers of crimes, both DV and non-DV, in the baseline period. Lessons implicit from research: DV crimes should be sanctioned more severely than non-DV crimes. More severe sanctions (both the conditions imposed by the courts and the accountability required by probation staff) deterred recidivism over the life course. Faculty will also consider “dosage-based” sentencing that is constructed through assessments of the risks posed by batterers and the needs they have for services to enhance their chances for desistance and compliance with DV and other laws.

Click here to access the recording.



Holistic Safety Planning Using An Alternative Risk Assessment Framework 

May 13, 2014

Presenter: Sherry Hamby, Ph.D., Research Professor of Psychology and Director of the Life Paths Research Program at the University of the South.

Description: Safety planning for domestic violence has changed little in decades and still relies heavily on one-size-fits-all checklists. This workshop describes an alternative risk assessment framework, Multiple Criteria Decision Making (MCDM), which is common in environmental science and other fields where they also deal with complex problems.  This workshop will teach the use of the VIGOR, an MCDM-based, holistic, family-centered approach to safety planning with victims of domestic violence.  Data from two studies using the VIGOR will be presented and copies of the tool will be provided to all participants.

Click here to access the recording.



Immigration 101: Immigration Remedies in Removal Proceeding and your Role as an Advocate


April 28, 2014


Presenters:
Sonia Parras Konrad, ASISTA Co-Director and Cecelia Friedman Levin, ASISTA Staff Attorney


Description:
In this webinar, our experts, Sonia Parras Konrad and Cecelia Friedman Levin, will introduce participants to basic concepts in immigration law, common immigration legal terms, an overview of the government agencies involved in making immigration decisions, and basic know-your-rights information for immigrant survivors affected by domestic violence, sexual assault, trafficking and stalking.

Click here to access the recording.



Domestic Violence-Related Firearm Prohibition Enforcement Efforts in Wisconsin

April 23, 2014

Presenters: Tess Meuer and Tony Gibart of End Domestic Abuse WI (formerly the WI Coalition Against Domestic Violence)

Description: The presenters will describe the firearms surrender laws contained in WI restraining orders; the failure statewide to implement those laws; a statewide collaborative committee effort to discuss effective implementation; findings of pilot counties which undertook projects to learn more about what is needed to implement firearms surrender; and the recently passed legislation which assures a statewide process for firearms surrender implementation.  This new law addresses the restraining order hearings, and procedures for surrender of firearms as well as storing and later claiming surrendered firearms in domestic violence-related cases. Tess and Tony will emphasize the role of Coalition staff in these efforts, and their assessments of the strengths and challenges which led to the need for and passage of this legislation.

Click here to access the recording. 



Fatality Reviews: Process and Outcomes
 

April 21, 2014

Presenters: Heather Storer, MSW is a doctoral candidate at the University of Washington School of Social Work; Kelly Starr, MSW is the Director of Communications at the Washington State Coalition Against Domestic Violence; Taryn Lindhorst, PhD, LCSW is the Carol LaMare Associate Professor of Social Work at the University of Washington; and Jenny Aszman, LMSW has coordinated the Georgia Domestic Violence Fatality Review Project at the Georgia Commission on Family Violence for the last two years.


Description: The faculty will discuss research on Domestic Violence Fatality Review (DVFR) team initiatives. DVFR teams are a means of identifying systemic gaps in the response to domestic violence and in clarifying opportunity points for prevention of femicide by legal and health systems, as well as community members and family/friends/co-workers. Little is known about whether DVFRs facilitate change in community-level response to domestic violence. The research undertaken by the faculty evaluated whether the recommendations made by one state-level DVFR had an effect on community and organizational priorities and practices and whether these were implemented by the various institutions involved in coordinated DV response at the county level. The faculty will also describe other models of DVFRs and the potential various DVFR approaches have for systemic reform.


Article: Storer, Lindhorst and Starr, (2013). “The Domestic Violence Fatality Review: Can it Mobilize Community-Level Change?” Homicide Studies, XX(X) DOI: 10.1177/1088767913494202.

Click here to access the recording.




Firearms and Domestic Violence

March 21, 2014


Presenters: Daniel W. Webster, ScD, MPH is Director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy and Research and lead editor and contributor for Reducing Gun Violence in America: Informing Policy with Evidence and Analysis (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013); Shannon Frattaroli, PhD is an Associate Director for Outreach at the Center for Injury Research and Policy and an Associate Professor in the Health Policy and Management Department at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; and Eugenio Carral J.D. serves as the Domestic Violence Division Director for the Administrative Office of the Courts for the 11th Judicial Circuit of Florida in Miami Dade County.

Description: The faculty will discuss research on firearms in the context of severe and fatal domestic violence. They will address the risks posed by firearms of both homicide and suicide, health impacts of gun injuries, as well as prevention and retrieval initiatives. The system operative in the Miami-Dade courts for identification, surrender and retrieval, search and seizure, storage, and return will be examined. Forms utilized in the firearms retrieval process will be considered.

Article: Garen J. Wintemute, Shannon Frattaroli, Barbara E. Claire, Katherine A. Vittes, and Daniel W. Webster, (February, 2014). “Identifying Armed Respondents to Domestic ViolenceRestraining Orders and Recovering Their Firearms: Process Evaluation of anInitiative in California”. American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 104, No. 2, e113 – e118.


Click here to access the recording.




Pornography and The Abuse of Women

March 5, 2014

Presenters: Walter S. DeKeseredy, Ph.D. is the Anna Deane Carlson Endowed Chair of Social Sciences and Professor of Sociology in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at West Virginia University;Rus Ervin Funk is the Executive Director of MensWork, eliminating violence against women; and Angelita Velasco Gunn is the Associate Director for the Michigan Coalition to End Domestic and Sexual Violence.


Description: The faculty will discuss research on the significant contribution of pornography and “porn culture” to violence against women. They will examine the impact of the pornography industry on the sexual exploitation/coercion and economic oppression of women.  Faculty will describe challenges to the porn industry and the culture of distain and subordination of women that it promotes. Organizing initiatives to curtail the pervasive degradation of women through pornography in the media/internet and pop culture will be discussed.


Article: DeKeseredy, W.S. & Olsson, P. (2011). “Adult Pornography, Male Peer Support, and Violence Against Women: The “Dark Side” of the Internet.”  Eds. Martin, Garcia-Ruiz & Edwards. Facilitating Humanity and Combating Social Deviations: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Information Science Reference. Hershey, PA. And various other articles and publications of the faculty.

Click here to access the recording.




Male Peer Support & Violence Against Women: The History and Verification of a Theory


February 28, 2014

Presenters: Martin D. Schwartz, Ph.D. is Visiting Professor at George Washington University, and Professor Emeritus at Ohio University, and the author, co-author or editor of 14 books and over 130 articles, chapters and essays and Walter S. DeKeseredy is Anna Deane Carlson Endowed Chair of Social Sciences and Professor of Sociology at West Virginia University.

Description: “The problem is simple. In most cultures, most of the time, all men, most men, or at least a great many men receive male peer support for the victimization of females.” So write  Walter S. DeKeseredy and Martin D. Schwartz in their latest book, Male Peer Support & Violence against Women: The History and Verification of a Theory.  The theory, first announced by DeKeseredy in 1988, holds that certain all-male peer groups encourage, justify, and support the abuse of women. DeKeseredy and Schwartz will discuss the history and development of the theory, the extensive evidence and support it has received over the past 25 years in numerous publications, and how it plays out in different settings including the Internet.

Click here to access the recording.



Reproductive Coercion and Intimate Partner Violence

February 26, 2014

Presenter: Lisa James, Director, National Health Resource Center on Domestic Violence, Futures Without Violence. 

Description: Reproductive Coercion is a relatively new concept in the field—simply defined, it is when a partner is trying to get a woman pregnant against her will or control the outcome of a pregnancy through threats, intimidation or by tampering with contraceptive (birth control) methods. Emergency Contraception (also known as EC or the “morning after pill”) can be taken up to 5 days after unintended/unwanted sex to prevent pregnancy by a perpetrator. Various domestic violence programs across the country have been integrating assessment for reproductive coercion and helping survivors get EC during intake or within a 24-hour time period after arrival to shelter. For some programs, this was simple to implement, others experienced some resistance and confusion. This webinar will explore successes,barriers and discuss promising practices.

Click here to access the recording.



New Perspectives on Gender Justice in Clinical Teaching

January 31, 2014

Description: In 1999, Simon Gonzales kidnapped his three daughters from the front yard of his estranged wife, Jessica, in violation of a protective order issued by a Colorado court.  Despite Jessica Gonzales’s numerous calls to law enforcement asking them to enforce her order, by the end of the night, her daughters had been killed.  Jessica sued the town of Castle Rock, Colorado, for its failure to enforce her protective order.  In 2005, the United States Supreme Court held that Jessica did not have a constitutional right to enforcement of the protective order that was meant to protect her and her three daughters from Simon Gonzales’s abuse.  Searching for another venue in which to have her claims heard, Jessica Gonzales, who subsequently remarried and changed her last name to Lenahan, filed a claim before the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, claiming human rights violations by both the Castle Rock police and the United States government.  In 2011, the Commission found that the United States had violated the human rights of Jessica and her daughters and recommended seven remedies, three pertaining to Jessica individually and four pertaining to the United States more generally.  The recommendations include reshaping stereotypes of and ending discrimination against victims of domestic violence.  Following the landmark ruling, advocates turned their attention to the implementation of the Lenahan decision.  Those efforts have included the passage of resolutions in a number of localities echoing the Commission’s declaration that freedom from domestic violence is a fundamental human right, as well as discussions of how such resolutions—and the Lenahan decision itself—might be used in domestic litigation.  This webinar will provide background on the Lenahan decision, examine the specific efforts around passage of the local government resolutions and the wider discussion of how to integrate the decision into advocacy on behalf of women subjected to abuse in the United States, and consider what the next steps for the movement to bring human rights home in this area might be.  The webinar will also suggest ways to think beyond our traditional silos—domestic violence, sexual assault, human rights—and construct clinics that work across subject matter areas to address gender violence more broadly.

Click here to access the recording.


Economic Justice for Battered Women - Part Two

November 21, 2013

Presenter: Kim Pentico, Economic Justice Specialist, National Network to End Domestic Violence (NNEDV)

Description: Part 2 - Tools for Advocates: Participants will be provided a brief overview of financial basics, including budgeting, credit, loans and long-term planning.

Click here to access the recording.



Researcher/Practitioner Collaboration: Strategies for Successful Implementation

November 15, 2013

Presenters: Tami Sullivan, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry and the Director of Family Violence Research and Programs at the Yale School of Medicine, Bonnie S. Fisher, Ph.D. is a Professor in the Division of Criminal Justice and Research Fellow in the Center for Criminal Justice Research at the University of Cincinnati, Leslye Orloff, J. D. is an Adjunct Professor and the Director of the National Immigrant Women’s Advocacy Project (NIWAP) at American University, Washington College of Law, andTeri Faragher, M.S.W. has worked as a victim and community advocate to end interpersonal and family violence for over 30 years.

Description: The social science faculty will review the results of The Researcher-Practitioner Partnerships Study (RPPS) and discuss the 6 products generated by that initiative.  The attorney and advocate faculty will offer reflections on the RPPS report and share lessons learned from their own robust collaborations with researchers.

Click here to access the recording.



Economic Justice for Battered Women - Part One
 

November 4, 2013

Presenter: Kim Pentico, Economic Justice Specialist, National Network to End Domestic Violence (NNEDV)

Description: Part 1 - Financial Abuse 101: Financial abuse is a common tactic used by batterers to control and isolate their partners with far-reaching and devastating consequences.  This webinar will provide information to consider before ending a relationship, including strategies to protect safety.

Click here to access the recording.



Teen Dating Violence: Economic Impact -  
Education & Earnings

October 29, 2013   

Presenter: Adrienne Adams, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Ecological-Community Psychology, MSU

Content: Dating violence in adolescence not only takes a physical and emotional toll on young women, it also leads to less education and lower earnings later in life.    A young woman's educational performance may be hindered by her partner's actions, such as destroying books or homework or causing injuries that prevent her from going to school. Researchers analyzed survey data of about 500 single mothers who were, on average, 32 years old and earned less than $7,000 per year. Participants who had been victimized by dating partners as adolescents obtained significantly less education.  Each additional year of education was associated with an extra $855 in earnings.

Click
here to access the recording.



Risk Assessment Skills for Advocates 

October 22, 2013

Presenters: Kate Johnson, LICSW, Community Services Coordinator, Jeanne Geiger Crisis Center, Inc

Content: Advocates understand the importance of risk assessment though some many struggle with how to conduct assessments in a trauma informed way. A four-stage process for conducting risk assessments with victims will be presented. This framework provides a method for assessment that balances information gathering and relationship building with consideration for the victim’s history of violence. Advocates will learn concrete strategies for responding to victims at high risk of a lethal or near lethal assault.

Click here to access the recording.



Trends in Clinical Teaching: Collaborations and Case Types 

October 15, 2013

Presenters: Jeana Lungwitz, Marsha Perez and Terry Secrest

Description: Jeana Lungwitz, director of the Domestic Violence Clinic at the University of Texas School of Law, will be joined by social worker, Terry Secrest, and former Domestic Violence Clinic student, Marsha Perez, in discussing the collaboration between law students and social work students in assisting survivors of domestic violence in the wide array of cases accepted by the Clinic.

Click here to access the recording.



Institutional Betrayal – Higher Education, the Military, and the Criminal Justice System
 

September 27, 2013

Presenters: Carly Smith, Glenna Tinney and Stephanie Avalon

Content: Faculty will explore the various ways that critical systems have historically betrayed the trust of battered women and sexual assault survivors.  The three institutions examined in this webinar are higher education, the U.S. military and the criminal legal system.  In failing to institute and implement protections contained in law and policy, these institutions have breached the social contract made with survivors.  The broken promises publicized by the institutions, promises of justice, opportunity, safety, and accountability, have induced survivors to step up and out, taking risks to safeguard themselves and their children and to escape the violence and coercive controls of their assailants.  The betrayal of the faith invested in these institutions by survivors has too frequently placed them in enhanced peril, and has sometimes compromised the relationships of advocates with the survivors they serve.  Faculty will explore both the betrayals and strategies to end the systemic failings/malfeasance of these critical systems.

Articles:  Smith, C. & J. Freyd.  (February, 2013).  “Dangerous Safe Havens: Institutional Betrayal Exacerbates Sexual Trauma.” Journal of Stress Management, 26, 119 – 124.

Click here to access the recording.



The Changing Racial Dynamics of Women's Incarceration

September 25, 2013

Presenter: Marc Mauer, The Sentencing Project

Description: In February, The Sentencing Project released the report, The Changing Racial Dynamics of Women’s Incarceration, written by Marc Mauer.  This webinar, presented by the report’s author, will discuss the major findings of the report including how from 2000 to 2009 there was a dramatic shift in the racial composition of the women’s prison population and that incarceration rates for African-Americans dropped sharply from 2000 to 2009, especially for women, while the rate of imprisonment for whites and Hispanics rose over the same decade.

Click here to access the recording.



Exploring Where to Stand on Stand Your Ground: Recent Changes in Self-Defense Laws and Implications for Victims of Battering

July 24, 2013

Presenter: Cindene Pezzell, Legal Coordinator, NCDBW

Description: Do "Stand Your Ground" (SYG) laws exclude victims of battering?  Are they particularly harmful to victims of battering who defend themselves?  Is the problem with the laws themselves or the application of the laws? Should these laws be repealed or modified? 

The discussion will explore what SYG laws are (and aren't); give examples of how laws have been misapplied; discuss how SYG laws can actually reduce barriers for victims of battering who defend themselves; offer suggestions about how to increase likelihood of proper application of the law.   This webinar, originally scheduled before the verdict in the Zimmerman case, will not include an extensive discussion on that case or any other specific cases. 

Click here to access the recording.



Firearms Surrender/Retrieval and Protection Orders; Research and Practice in North Carolina

July 15, 2013

Presenter: Beth Moracco, Ph.D., M.P.H. is an applied public health researcher and evaluator with extensive global and domestic experience conducting research on gender-based violence, including intimate partner violence (IPV).
 
Content: Dr. Moracco will review the findings and recommendations of Preventing Firearms Violence Among Victims of Intimate Partner Violence: An Evaluation of a New North Carolina Law. Discussants will explore firearms retrieval/confiscation practices and processes, forms and outcomes pursuant to the issuance of civil protection orders in several jurisdictions.

Article: Moracco, K.E., Clark, K., Espersen, C, Bowling, J. (September, 2006). “Preventing Firearm Violence Among Victims of Intimate Partner Violence: An Evaluation of a New North Carolina Law.” Final Report. National Institute of Justice, US Department of Justice. NCJ 215773

Click here to access the recording.



Islamic Marriage Contracts & Divorces: Implications for Legal Advocacy

June 18, 2013

Content: Advocates and attorneys working with Muslim battered women are often faced with complicated legal issues surrounding civil and religious marriages and civil and religious divorces.  Because abusers often use legal systems to gain an advantage in dissolution, divorce settlement and child custody, it is critical for legal and social service advocates, survivors of domestic violence, and community members to understand the religious and legal foundations of Islamic marriage contracts.  This webinar will provide brief introduction to Islamic family law and the family laws of several Muslim majority countries. This will be followed by an explanation of how and why Islamic family law is relevant in matrimonial litigation in American courts with a focus on a survey of cases from around the country. This will include conflicts of law, jurisdictional issues, enforcement of marriage contracts, recognition of foreign marriages and divorce, religious divorces and related topics.

Faculty: Abed Awad, J.D., Private Practice and Chic Dabby, Director, Asian & Pacific Islander Institute on Domestic Violence.

Click here to access the recording.



Teen Protection Orders – Research and Advocacy

June 3, 2013

Content: Dr. Klein will review the findings and recommendations of the NYS Teen PO study. It is the first to examine implementation of POs to address teen dating violence. New York amended its OP statute effective July 2008 to allow juvenile and teens without a child in common to obtain OPs for dating violence. As a result, examination of all orders involving juvenile and teen petitioners, through age 18, in 2009 and 2010, represents a study of a new legal remedy for teen dating violence, still a work in progress.

Attorney Sta. Ana will explore OP process issues. He will address the importance of tailoring PO relief requests to the individual needs of teens. He will also discuss implementation of orders issued, including safety planning and advocacy with their families and in all the relevant venues where teens attend school, live, work, engage in athletics, etc. Advocacy with parents, teachers, school administration, coaches, employers is often more critical for teens than for adult victims - perhaps because these stakeholders are not ready to respect the agency and autonomy of teen survivors.

Faculty: Andrew R. Klein, Ph.D. is a Senior Research Associate at Advocates for Human Potential.  Andrew Sta. Ana is the Supervising Attorney at Day One’s direct legal services program.

Click here to access the recording. [Due to technical difficulties the audio portion of this webinar doesn't begin until 17:30.]




Strategies for System Change: Rethinking System Responses to Trafficking Victims

May 21, 2013

Content: In recent years Minnesota has taken significant steps toward protecting victims of sex trafficking and holding perpetrators accountable. Join Helen Rubenstein and Michele Garnett McKenzie of The Advocates for Human Rights for an overview of the issue and of progress toward a victim-centered approach to ending sex trafficking, including an overview of the Safe Harbor for Sexually Exploited Youth Act, the No Wrong Door model of comprehensive housing and services for sexually exploited youth, and ways in which we can prepare for the law’s implementation in 2014.

Faculty: Helen Rubenstein, Staff Attorney, and Michele Garnett McKenzie, Advocacy Director, The Advocates for Human Rights.

Click here to access the recording.



Human Trafficking for Law Enforcement and Victim Services
 

May 2, 2013

Content: Human trafficking, especially sex trafficking involving foreign nationals and minors, presents substantial challenges to investigators and victim advocates responding to such incidents. Human Trafficking for Law Enforcement and Victims Services is intended to provide practical information to the law enforcement officer and victims services professional. Legal and operational aspects, investigative steps, and key victim service tools are introduced and discussed.

Faculty: Jennifer McNew, Forensic Nurse at Adams County Children's Advocacy Center and Louis “Chip” Morlier, Special Agent with the Department of Homeland Security and a Professor at Penn State University.


Click here to access the recording.



Federal and State Firearm Prohibitions – Part Two

April 12, 2013

Content: We will explore coordination with federal counterparts and include discussion of current community efforts to address firearms in the hands of batterers. Additional discussion on strategies for removal of firearms from domestic violence offenders, and strategies to aid in preventing the transfer and return of firearms to prohibited persons will be included in the webinar. The importance of creating a coordinated community response to firearms that addresses use, possession, and removal to enhance survivor safety will be highlighted.

Faculty: Pete Helein, Chief of the Appleton Police Department and Millicent Shaw Phipps, Managing Attorney for the National Center on Protection Orders and Full Faith and Credit (NCPOFFC).

Click here to access the recording.



Federal and State Firearm Prohibitions – Part One 

March 26, 2013

Content: Firearms in the hands of batterers pose a significant threat to law enforcement, survivors and the community. There are currently federal laws that prohibit certain people from purchasing and possessing weapons.  Many states have enacted similar legislation. This webinar will explore both federal and state gun prohibitions related to domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence and stalking. The primary focus will be on the federal statutes, their applicability and relation to state firearm laws related to domestic violence.

Faculty: Pete Helein, Chief of the Appleton Police Department and Millicent Shaw Phipps, Managing Attorney for the National Center on Protection Orders and Full Faith and Credit (NCPOFFC).

Click here to access the recording.



Advocacy Initiated Response to Children of Domestic Violence Survivors: New Zealand’s KIDshine

March 21, 2013

Content: In Auckland New Zealand, when police respond to domestic violence incidents, community advocates follow up with the adult survivors; but children also receive in-home visits to address safety planning, trauma, and recovery. This webinar includes discussion of how the project was set up, its purpose, structure and outcomes.  SHINE bases its philosophy on Duluth’s DAIP and the similar Hamilton (NZ) Abuse Intervention Project. The core practice of having advocates contact women following their partners’ arrest for a domestic abuse-related charge originated with Duluth’s DAIP. Auckland is the largest, most diverse city in New Zealand, with 1.3 million people, situated in the north of the North Island.

Faculty: Jill Proudfoot, Service Director at SHINE, Auckland New Zealand. Jill provides leadership and support for 17 staff members, as well as a large team of contractors, Helpline staff and volunteers. She is also part of Shine’s senior management team. BWJP Staff: Graham Barnes and Stephanie Avalon

Click here to access the recording.



HIV Certification & Compliant Statutes

March 15, 2013

Content: The HIV Certification requirement in the Grants to Encourage Arrest Policies and Enforcement of Protection Orders has proven problematic for applicants in some states. OVW Attorney Advisor Marnie Shiels will discuss HIV statutes that comply with the certification requirements, both state and local laws, and address the problems that jurisdictions tend to run into in drafting these laws and ways to work around them.  To illustrate such a successful effort, Karen Dalton will talk about the recently-passed HIV statute in Pennsylvania and the process involved in getting it into law.

Faculty: Marnie Shiels, J.D., is an Attorney Advisor in the Office on Violence Against Women of the U.S. Department of Justice and Karen Dalton, J.D., is currently Senior Counsel to the Committee on the Judiciary for the Pennsylvania House of Representatives.

Click here to access the recording.



Using the Advocate Initiated Response: Contacting Victims After their Partner’s Arrest

February 21, 2013

Content: Following our webinar on research showing the effectiveness of advocacy and particularly the advocate initiated response, Rose Thelen will present on this approach to engaging victims caught up in the criminal justice system. Rose will discuss the history, philosophy, and rationale behind this approach as well as concerns of advocacy programs who haven’t used this intervention. These interventions require cooperative agreements with local police and Rose will share her experience working with law enforcement and developing protocols for police contacts.  Managing contacts and training staff and volunteers will also be addressed. In other words, everything you need to know to use the advocate initiated response. 

Faculty: Rose Thelen is a Technical Assistance Partner for Praxis International, providing training and technical assistance to Department of Justice Office On Violence Against Women rural grantees. She has also worked with Praxis to conduct Safety and Accountability Audits in a number of settings. Rose is also co-founder of the Gender Violence Institute in Clearwater, MN.

Click here to access the recording.



Denver’s Domestic Violence Early Intervention Team (TRIAGE): Policy, Practice & Research


February 5, 2013

Content: Begun in January 2006, Denver’s TRIAGE is a collaborative, multidisciplinary team that seeks to identify & assess risk factors for continuing, severe domestic violence, to provide active and immediate outreach to support DV victims, and to achieve rapid containment of offenders. Outreach is designed to ensure that DV victims receive valuable information regarding Protection Orders, safety planning, counseling and linkage with other services within 48 hours of the reported incident. When necessary, the Triage Detective & police victim assistant will do a home visit in an effort to help increase victim safety. An NIJ study, directed by Anne P. DePrince, Ph.D. at the University of Denver Dept of Psychology, addresses the impact TRIAGE has had on female victims of domestic violence in the Denver area.

Faculty: Margaret Abrams, M.A. is Program Director for the Domestic Violence Early Intervention Team with the Denver District Attorney’s Office, Dora-Lee Larson, M.A. is the Executive Director of the Denver D.V. Coordinating Council for 8 years and Community Education Director for SafeHouse Denver, and Anne P. DePrince, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor in the Psychology Department at the University of Denver.

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The Youthful Offender Domestic Violence Court: Can A Court Help Break The Cycle?

January 29, 2013

Content: What is teen dating violence and what are the challenges in addressing it? How has the court system responded in the past and how can it change to make a difference in the lives of teens? This webinar led by STEPS to End Family Violence’s Teen Accountability Program, an adolescent batterers’ program, and Center for Court Innovation (Center) will discuss these key issues of teen dating violence and highlight one court system's response, the Youthful Offender Domestic Violence Court (YODVC).

Faculty: Gene A. Johnson, Jr. facilitates and develops curriculum for court mandated juvenile male batter’s intervention classes for Edwin Gould Services For Family STEPS To End Family Violence Teen Accountability Program in Brooklyn and Bronx, New York, and Rebecca Thomforde Hauser, Associate Director, Domestic Violence and Sex Offense Programs Center for Court Innovation.

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Black Women’s Use of Violence in Intimate Partner Relationships and the Advocacy Response

January 28, 2013

Content: This presentation will address Black women’s use of responsive violence.  The presenters will look at ways to engage with women about their use of violence, placing the violence in context, while recognizing and validating resistance and emphasizing safety. This  webinar will be a joint presentation between  the Institute on Domestic Violence in the African American Community (IDVACC) and the Battered Women’s Justice Project (BWJP).

Faculty: Dr. Hillary Potter, Professor, University of Colorado at Boulder and Umi (Shelia) Hankins, Co-Executive Director, IDVAAC.

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Strong Moms, Safe Kids

January 23, 2013

Content: Advocates and service providers both in Duluth and nationally identified a lack of advocacy for women in the months and years following separation from their abusive partner. Just when she needs it most, support and advocacy dwindles, creating a deep gap in services and safety. The larger societal and systemic assumption is that once the relationship ends, so too does the violence. In Duluth, our experience through years of intensive advocacy with women who have been battered, their children, and men who batter is that the violence, power and control does not end. Instead, it simply changes forms. If children are in the picture, men who batter use their children as the vehicles for their continued abuse, harassment and intimidation.

Faculty: Jill Abernathey has been associated with the Duluth Domestic Abuse Intervention Project since 1987, Sara Lee, Family Services Coordinator at First Witness Child Abuse Resource Center, has 11 years of experience in various fields working with families and children in crisis, and Frances Macaulay is an experienced legal advocate for women affected by domestic abuse, stalking, and sexual assault.


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Honoring Resistance

December 18, 2012

Presenter: Nick Todd is a psychologist who has worked in the areas of addictions, trauma and violence, and mental health since 1987. Gillian Weaver-Dunlop is the manager of a counselling service for perpetrators and victims of family violence, at  the Calgary Women’s Emergency Shelter.

Content: The response-based approach for working with victims and perpetrators of abuse was developed by Dr. Allan Wade, Dr. Linda Coates, and Nick Todd (R. Psych). Nick Todd and Gillian Weaver-Dunlop have been using the response-based approach for many years in their therapeutic work. This webinar will focus on working with victims. Nick and Gillian will discuss how therapists using this approach a) honour a woman’s resistance to violence and abuse, and b) contest the blaming and pathologizing of victims.

Using case examples, Nick and Gillian will explore the five basic assumptions that underpin the response based approach. These assumptions include: 1) Whenever people are badly treated, they resist; 2) People tend not to notice that victims resist abuse; 3) Perpetrators know that victims will resist, so they make plans to try to stop the victim’s resistance; 4) abusive and violent behaviour is deliberate, conscious and planned, and 5) when it comes to domestic violence, appearances are deceiving (Wade, Coates, & Todd, n.d.).

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Is Advocacy Effective? A Review of the Research Evidence

November 20, 2012

Presenter: Cris Sullivan, Ph.D.

Content: Most domestic violence service programs engage in various forms of advocacy. Advocacy involves more than providing emotional support and referrals - it is a distinct activity that involves working to change policies, practices and conditions that are negatively impacting people. Some domestic violence advocates work on a wide range of areas with survivors, while others focus on one particular system, such as the welfare, housing, or legal system. Few advocacy interventions have been rigorously evaluated, and the belief in their effectiveness has largely been based on anecdotal evidence. This is problematic as more and more as advocates are being asked to discuss programming and “evidence based practices.” This is problematic as more and more funders are pushing “evidence based practice.” In this webinar, Cris Sullivan will review the empirical evidence behind providing advocacy services for domestic violence survivors. There are a number of studies that have shown how effective advocacy can be, and these findings can be used to justify funding such services. For more information visit
www.dvevidenceproject.org.

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Stalking: Prevalence, Lethality, and Impact


November 8, 2012

Presenter:
Jessamyn Tracy, National Stalking Resource Center

Content: Research indicates that 6.6 million people were stalked in one year in the United States. Yet, stalking is a crime that is often misunderstood, minimized or missed entirely. This webinar will address the dynamics of stalking, including the most common stalking behaviors, the relationship between victims and offenders, and the impact of stalking on victims. We will also discuss the intersection of stalking and domestic violence and other crimes.

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Advocating on Behalf of Battered Women When the Abuser Works for a Law Enforcement Agency

October 18, 2012

Presenter: Jan Russell, JD. Director, Violence Against Women Policy Project, Cook County Sheriff's Office,
Sheriff's Women's Justice Programs.

Content: While most of the dynamics of domestic violence remain the same regardless of the abuser’s employer, battered women abused by members of law enforcement agencies, sworn and civilian, face unique obstacles and challenges. This workshop discusses the differences in dynamics in these situations, the obstacles and challenges presented by these cases, and effective strategies for advocating for battered women.

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Baltimore Says: Nobody Ever Earned it - Making a Public Service Video That’s REAL


October 3, 2012

Presenter: Lisa Nitsch, Teen Program and Gateway Project Program Manager at House Of Ruth Maryland.

Content: Domestic violence and sexual assault agencies often want to make public awareness resources to promote nonviolence and their work. However, what often gets produced is something amateurish, or even worse, a slick product that has little integrity. House Of Ruth in Baltimore partnered with a statewide government agency and a local fatherhood program to produce a moving controversial video that has both integrity and high production values. This webinar describes their purpose and process, and helps other communities consider how to produce their own public awareness tools.

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Seattle's Step-Up Program: A Curriculum-Based Program Addressing Teens' Violence Against Their Parents


September 20, 2012

Content: In this webinar, Lily Anderson and Greg Routt will discuss youth violence towards parents as a link in the cycle of violence, what factors put youth at risk for using violence at home and how parents are affected. The discussion will also include a description of Step Up, an intervention specifically designed to address this form of family violence.  Step Up is a curriculum based program that brings parents and teens together in structured group sessions aimed at restoring healthy family relationships.

Faculty: Lily Anderson has an M.S.W. from the University of Washington. She has worked with the Step-Up Program since 1998 and co-authored the Step-Up curriculum, and Gregory Routt has an M.A. in Psychology from Antioch University in Seattle and has worked in the field of domestic violence for 15 years.

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Reframing Domestic Violence as Coercive Control, Part 2 of 2: What This Means for Interventions


May 21, 2012

Content: Evan Stark will continue the presentation he began April 19th, explaining why the violence model is insufficient and describing how coercive control harms women’s most basic rights to liberty, equality and personhood. This webinar will place an emphasis on discussion of what recognizing coercive control implies for intervention.

Presenter:
Evan Stark, Professor of Public Administration at Rutgers University and Chair of the Department of Urban Health Administration at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey’s School of Public Health on the Newark campus.

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Reframing Domestic Violence as Coercive Control
, Part 1 of 2

April 19, 2012

Content: It appears that a majority of women who seek outside assistance because of partner abuse are victims of coercive control, a pattern of subjugation that has more in common with hostage-taking than the conventional picture of domestic violence. Drawing on case material from his forensic practice and the evidence he has summarized in his award-winning 2007 book, Coercive Control: How Men Entrap Women in Personal Life, Evan Stark will use this webinar to discuss why the violence model is insufficient; identify and illustrate the elements and significance of coercive control; and describe how coercive control harms women's most basic rights to liberty, equality and personhood. The webinar will conclude with a discussion of what recognizing coercive control implies for intervention.

Presenter: Evan Stark, Professor of Public Administration at Rutgers University and Chair of the Department of Urban Health Administration at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey’s School of Public Health on the Newark campus

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Open Doors: Development of a "Best Practice" Toolkit for Working with Domestic Violence Survivors with Criminal Histories


November 29, 2011

Speakers: Dr. Cris M. Sullivan is Professor of Ecological/ Community Psychology at Michigan State University and coordinator of MSU's Violence Against Women Research and Outreach Initiative. Her areas of expertise include conducting longitudinal, experimental evaluations of community interventions for abused women, and improving the community response to violence against women.  Dr. Sheryl Pimlott Kubiak is an Associate Professor and Director of Doctoral Education at the School of Social Work at Michigan State University.  Her research interests include the intersections across criminal justice, victimization, mental health and substance abuse. Discussants: Paula Callen, M.A.O.M., Building the Safety Net Project Director with the Michigan Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence. Hosts: Barbara Hart, J.D. and Kari Sonmore.

Content: The majority of incarcerated women have also been victims of intimate partner violence. Upon their release from jail/prison, these women have difficulty finding services that address their complex needs. Often, domestic violence staff members feel ill-equipped to deal with these “high needs” women, feel that their presence is a threat to others, or do not have the information and skills needed to be most useful. This can result in women having no access to services they desperately need, which jeopardizes their safety as well as their freedom.  We describe a collaborative effort to create a Best Practice Toolkit useful for both criminal legal personnel and domestic violence advocates. The team included community organizations, survivors, university researchers, and state and national organizations.

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